• By Erik Hoffer

    Remarkably, the need to protect and secure unattended transported cargo, seems to be a debatable concept? Documented losses through damage far exceed those from theft. In fact losses in some industries and from certain products through counterfeiting, diversion and all forms of fraud, also seem to exceed those quantifiable losses from supply chain theft. So where should business rank theft, and a secure supply chain, in terms of a budgeted priority and corporate strategic focus against other known threats? Is it worth caring about this problem at all? Who is financially responsible for remedy and then who is responsible for the loss? Is it smart to seek remedy proactively or do you wait to become a victim before taking action? Does the same entity pay when goods are stolen as when goods are damaged? What role does the shipper have vs. the carrier in reducing or assuming risk? All of these questions elicit a variety of unrelated answers depending on who is being asked and what products they transport or ship. This array of answers defines the dilemma of where does cargo security fall in corporate strategic planning from a shipper or carrier prospective?

  • CSA Principal Erik Hoffer's Chapter entitled "The Context of Global Supply Chain Security" sets the stage for this book on Global Supply Chain Security edited by Andrew R. Thomas and Sebastan Vaduva which presents new theoretical insights, practical strategies, and policy initiatives in the rapidly evolving field of global supply chain security.

  • If the post-September 11 world has taught us anything, it is that the tools for conducting serious terrorist attacks are becoming easier to ac quire. Therefore intention becomes an increasingly important factor in the formation of terrorist cells. This study is an attempt to look at how that intention forms, hardens and leads to an attack or attempted attack using real world case studies . . .

  • The underlying message in this current interview with Brandman is clear: In a high-risk world, companies must be proactive when in comes to supply chain security; to be otherwise, invites a host of serious and potentially devastating consequences.

  • By Erik Hoffer

    Our transportation industry serves as the pulse of commerce, and the heart of our economy. Collectively we move food, clothing, and most other essential goods by truck, rail and air. The question I propose here deals with the transparent nature of logistics masking the fact that we are not alone in our efforts. There a black side to logistics and no one sees it. There are contra-logistic forces out there which replicate our processes for their personal gain. and commonly deliver stolen, diverted and counterfeit goods to clients right under our noses! Besides essentials, contraband drugs and illegal weapons are also commonly transported using commercial trucks and courier services.

  • By Erik Hoffer

    The 911 attack created a new reality and a broad-based credible fear in America. The awareness of terrorism has spread from the living room to the boardroom. Business is suddenly acutely aware of terrorism as a major threat to profitability. Before 911 business risk usually dealt with lost sales, not death or destruction. Today, the threats of biologics or explosives infiltrating our plants and offices is real. Media feeds the paranoia but the basis of concern is genuine. Those who were prone to dismiss certain threats to personnel and profits now open their mail with apprehension! Times have changed . . .