Cargo trucks have become a weapon of choice for global terror attacks.  This Unclassified TSA Report details the Threat Landscape, Indictaors and Countermeasures.

Imagine you arrive at a facility to pick up a load and, checking in with personnel at the gate, the man in the guard shack looks confused, checks and double-checks his list of impending arrivals, only to tell you you’ve already been there. The load is gone.

It’s a situation that’s become more and more common over the years since the so-called “fictitious pickup” cargo theft mode drew enough attention in supply-chain-security circles to warrant specific attention.

The Homeland Security (DHS) Inspector General’s Office in a new report recently declared that background checks of port workers by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) aren’t as effective as they should be.

That comes as no surprise to those who routinely go in and out of the nation’s ports.

Jim Stewart, a long-time port hauler and former Teamster recruiter said, “Any port is a terrorist’s paradise” and that “Homeland Security is a joke.” . . . 

Some do's and don'ts from our friends at the Pharmaceutical Cargo Security Coalition

 

GPS jamming devices — which typically disrupt GPS and sometimes other frequencies over areas ranging from about 980 feet to more than 5 miles — have become almost standard issue for villains engaged in certain kinds of serious crime like cargo theft and drug trafficking.